mohabhoj

Chop the Top: Beet Greens

8 Comments

I am still working with the beets that I bought from the farmers’ market last Saturday. My focus this time was on the beet greens, which I have always thrown away until yesterday. I read online that beet greens are packed with vitamins A, B6, C and K along with antioxidants and fibre.

So I chopped the greens, stem and all, and sautéed it in olive oil that was flavored with a grated garlic clove and hot green chili. I added salt along with two teaspoons of ground poppy seeds and a teaspoon of ground mustard seeds. My husband’s discarded Krups coffee grinder always comes in handy when I need to grind spices. 

I cooked this for a while and added about half a cup of water during the process. Once the water evaporated I turned the stove off and let it cool. Then I blended the concoction in my mini food chopper. I served this with basmati rice; this experimental recipe is a keeper.

The use of shorshe (mustard)-posto (poppy) combo in a recipe is unique to Bengali cooking, I think .The addition of mustard introduced a distinctive pungent taste –– highly desirable to a Bengali palate –– to the greens. The use of poppy seeds gave the dish a creamy texture and of course it had that gorgeous ruby color from the stems.

Beet greens with ground poppy and mustard seeds

Beet greens with ground poppy and mustard seeds

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Author: livecook

www.mohabhoj.com

8 thoughts on “Chop the Top: Beet Greens

  1. Yes, I keep my beet greens too. They make one tasty stir fry. I like your recipe, with poppy seeds. Will give it a try.

  2. Like your variation with poppycseeds will try soon

  3. I would love to hear more about this intriguing mustard-poppy combination. Knowing Bengalis, I suppose there are some good fish recipes with that also?

    • Hi Aneela,
      I will definitely write a post about the use of mustard-poppy combo in Bengali cuisine. And you are absolutely right we use this combo to dish out fish recipes as well. But there are a lot of Bengali fish delicacies where we use just mustard seed paste.
      For the beet greens I used white poppy seeds, which is mainly used in Bengali cuisine.

  4. Also, not sure if you used black poppy or white poppy…or if it matters.

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